New role for Daventry MP after resignations from Brexit department

Tuesday, 10 Jul, 2018

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and Brexit minister David Davis resigned within hours of each other, denouncing a plan that the cabinet had only agreed on Friday, and fuelling speculation that May could face a leadership challenge.

Tory digital minister Matt Hancock - known for his self-branded social networking app - will now takeover Hunt's portfolio as Health Secretary. But furious lawmakers warned that she could split her Conservative Party trying to get her plan through Parliament. Leading proponents of Brexit called on her to abandon the deal struck with the Cabinet last Friday at Chequers, her country retreat outside London.

Mr Davis was the first to go, followed by Mr Baker, with Mr Johnson resigning in the afternoon, then Mr Green, and then finally Mr Burns. A handful of lawmakers who want a clean break from the European Union said privately they had submitted letters calling for a vote of confidence in May, though they hadn't met the threshold of 48 needed to trigger such a ballot. "It should be a chance to do things differently", adding "that dream is dying, suffocated by needless self-doubt".

"My concern is about the policy rather than the individual", he said.

The Guardian says the PM has faced down Brexit rebels "for now", reporting May's warning that divided cabinets lose elections.

"I heard last night it might be delayed so I think it bodes well that we can sit down to hammer out a deal which is good for the United Kingdom and the EU". He said that if Parliament was deadlocked, Britain might need to hold another referendum on leaving the EU. Brexit-supporting lawmakers were angered by the proposals, saying they would keep Britain tethered to the bloc and unable to change its rules to strike new trade deals around the world.

The UK and the European Union have been negotiating Brexit terms for more than a year now and have been hoping to agree broad aims for their future relationship in October. They also argued that the proposals breach several of the "red lines" that the government had set out, including a commitment to leave the EU's tariff-free customs union.

May defended her Brexit plan to lawmakers in the House of Commons on Monday, with Johnson absent from his usual place on the Conservative front bench.

Mr Davis, who has been Brexit Secretary since Mrs May became prime minister in 2016, said he had made compromises since taking on the role, but this was "one compromise too far".

Dominic Raab was appointed the new Brexit secretary on Monday.