Where to score a selfie with Trump Baby in London

Wednesday, 11 Jul, 2018

The US Embassy has now issued a set of guidelines to US citizens ahead of the mass protests, which include keeping a "low profile" and staying alert if in the proximity of the crowds, as they may "become violent".

Trump's visit to the U.K.is expected to be met with significant protests from left-wing activists, promoted by members of the left-wing Labour Party who have repeatedly called for Trump to be uninvited, particularly due to his administration's "zero-tolerance" immigration policies that separated children from their families at the border.

He will arrive in the United Kingdom on board Air Force One on Thursday afternoon, straight from the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation summit in Brussels, and will carry out a series of engagements on Friday before heading to Scotland for the weekend.

Temporary signs indicate road closures around the USA ambassador's residence, where special fences have been erected prior to the US presidential visit at the end of the week, in Regent's Park in London, Britain, July 10, 2018.

The biggest protest will take place in central London on Friday where thousands are expected to take to the streets to join the "Stop Trump" march.

The sad news for Trump Baby is that Trump himself apparently won't be spending much time in London itself and is unlikely to see his inflated, infantile likeness in person.

An alert posted on the embassy's website Tuesday listed advice for any America who unexpectedly finds themselves caught up in an anti-Trump demonstration.

US President Donald Trump is set to land in London on Thursday for a three-day visit to the UK. Then, Trump will head to Scotland for a few days. According to The Guardian, Trump's itinerary will largely keep him away from the capital city.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has given permission for a giant inflatable baby blimp that looks like Trump to fly over the Houses of Parliament during the president's visit.

Mr Khan said he supported the decision taken by the Greater London Authority, adding that it was not for him to be a "censor".