Thai Navy SEALs Share New Cave Rescue Video

Friday, 13 Jul, 2018

Rescuers freed the last four boys and their adult coach from the deep flooded Tham Luang cave in Chiang Rai on Tuesday, and already Pure Flix and Ivanhoe Pictures and have publicly stated their intention of telling the riveting tale.

The IT tech said that the divers were not heroes and directed attention to the rest of his team and the Thai Navy Seals. The children were well taken care of in the cave.

"If it rains, the water level goes up in two hours and we can't tell what the water is doing inside, so you thought you were doing a half-hour dive and now you are doing a two-hour dive, and do you have gas for that?"

Hospital director Chaiwetch Thanapaisal said all 13 rescued, including the boys' 25-year-old soccer coach, and four Thai Navy SEALs are "well".

The boys appeared to be in good spirits on Wednesday following their rescue earlier on Tuesday, reports Inside Edition. "My job was to transfer them along".

The boys lost on average 2kg during their ordeal but are said to be in good physical condition.

It also involved about 90 divers in all, 50 of them from overseas, as well as medics, ambulance drivers, and helicopter pilots to take the boys straight to hospital in the town of Chiang Rai.

He's got a very bouncy Australian accent and they [the rescued boys] seemed to find that quite relaxing and reassuring.

Footage released by the SEAL team showed seemingly prone boys - at least one in full diving mask and wetsuit - being stretchered along the jagged passageways.

Rescue chief Narongsak Osottanakorn told reporters today that the entire operation would not have been possible without the unique skills that Harris brought to the mission, though he did not elaborate.

At a school opposite the hospital in Chiang Rai where the boys are recovering, schoolchildren were in an excited, celebratory mood.

The movie would comparable to the 2015 film "The 33" starring Antonio Banderas, detailing the 2010 rescue of 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for over three months.

Derek Anderson, a 32-year-old rescue specialist with the US Air Force based in Okinawa, Japan, said the dozen boys and their coach were "incredibly resilient".

The most unsafe part of the journey out of the labyrinthine cave system was the first kilometer, during which they were required to squeeze through a narrow flooded channel.

First, filmmakers need to secure the rights from each of the boys' families, the coach, and any rescuers they want to portray in order to get their firsthand accounts of what happened.

The story of the entrapment of the boys and their coach in the cave and their dramatic rescue has captivated people around the world.

"The presence and support of someone who has had a shared experience of an extreme event will help them deal with the "normal" life waiting for them", Dunham explained.