Thai Soccer Team: What Happens Now That They've Been Rescued From Cave?

Friday, 13 Jul, 2018

The team became captured within a cave in Thailand on June 23 and survived for 18 long days before being miraculously rescued by a fearless group of global divers.

A second movie is being developed on the rescue of the 12 Thai footballers and their coach from a flooded cave after an 18-day ordeal, reports said. Samarn died on July 6 after losing consciousness during a mission to place oxygen tanks deep inside the cave, just two days before the first group of four boys was brought out.

The first footage of the Thai boys in hospital has been released.

After a 17-day struggle, an image of the Thai boys flashing victory sign, smiling and waving from their hospital beds gripped the world.

After exploring the caves on June 23, the soccer team and their coach were left stranded, around four kilometres inside the cave system after heavy rains and floodwater blocked their pathway out. The aim, Anderson said, was to make each of the boys "tightly packaged" so divers could keep control of them and adjust their air supply as needed. "Be good people, be a force for good for your country", Rear Admiral Apakorn Yuukongkaew, commander of Thailand's navy SEALS unit, said in a message to the boys before boarding a flight from Chiang Rai.

The Philippines on Friday joined the worldwide community in rejoicing with Thailand after the daring rescue of 12 members of a boys soccer team and their coach in a flooded cave complex in the northern part of the country.

But he said: "The most important thing to have was a full face mask which had been applied inside with positive pressure to enable them to breathe and to be relaxed enough so not to feel any anxiety during the process".

Rescue divers told BBC News the boys were heavily sedated during the rescue to prevent them from panicking in the water-filled passageways, which were barely large enough to fit through.

But they pressed on and, on July 8, the rescue began. Chu is teaming up with worldwide production company Ivanhoe Pictures (Ghoul) to bring the sensational rescue story.

Thai Navy SEALs also posted photos and a video of some of their operations in the cave on their Facebook page Wednesday. Before their discovery, they survived by drinking water dripping into their cramped refuge.

The boys, aged 11 to 16, had to dive for part of their journey out before they were put on green plastic toboggan-like stretchers and carried, at times through steep, rocky tunnels, with ropes strung overhead.

"We brought the children out like eggs protected in stone", Apakorn said, referencing a Thai saying equivalent to "velvet glove". "To see all that heroic bravery in the cave, and to get all the divers out, it's just such a touching event and so personal to me".

"This area will become a living museum, to show how the operation unfolded", Narongsak Osottanakorn, head of the rescue mission, said, according to Reuters. Our embassy in Thailand made this possible.